History & Background

Mission Junction is home to El Pueblo, the original Spanish settlement founded in 1781 asEl Pueblo de Nuestra Señora la Reina de los Ángeles. El Pueblo contains the shopping district Olvera Street created in 1930. Mission Junction is also home to Union Station, now celebrating its 75th year and is the hub of the Metro Transportation Authority. Before Union Station was built, it was the site of “Old Chinatown” before it was condemned by the city and relocated to its current location. The Mission Junction neighborhood is very diverse because it is home to Los Angeles history, the major transportation hub of the city; as well as a busy warehouse district. To the north of Union Station are warehouses, food distribution outlets, and medical companies.


Urban Housing

Due to all the different facets to Mission Junction, there is not much room for residential complexes. However, the Mozaic Apartments at Union Station are ideal for people who use Metro as their primary transportation. You can walk to Chinatown, jump on a train to just about anywhere in SoCal, or take the Metro Gold Line to Pasadena and the Purple & Red Lines to Koreatown or Hollywood in just a few minutes.

History & Background

Out of all the neighborhoods to go through re-development and bring in new residents, South Park’s contribution to the Downtown Renaissance stands out as the most aggressive and most promising. South Park used to be full of car dealerships, nightclubs, and “taxi dance halls,” and not the ideal neighborhood for residential high-rises. Fast forward 50 years, and there are construction cranes on every street as far as the eye can see.


Nightlife & Entertainment

Most notably, South Park is home to the Entertainment District containing Staples Center, L.A. Live, and the Los Angeles Convention Center. The Entertainment District has tons of hot restaurants like Katsuya sushi restaurant, Wolfgang Puck’s WP24 Asian fusion, Fleming’s Steakhouse, and many more. Beyond the Entertainment District you’ll find the popular Cana Rum Bar, FigOly Italian restaurant, Palm Restaurant, and the Vault Night Club (located in an old bank vault).


Urban Housing

South Park residential developments take a different approach than in the Historic Core or Arts District. Instead of converting and remodeling buildings, developers are starting from scratch to build skyscrapers and mixed-use megaplexes offering hundreds of luxury units. Currently, the Ritz-Carlton condos, Historic Gas Company Lofts and AVANT Apartments are just a few. However, with 20-plus construction projects underway in South Park, there are just too many to name here.

History & Background

This large area of Downtown Los Angeles is still very industrial and will probably stay that way. The Warehouse District is comprised of other smaller sections like the Flower, Toy, Produce, and Seafood Districts. While these areas aren’t mutually exclusive, it is evident which one you’re in simply by reading building names.


One of the most renowned areas in this neighborhood is the Flower District, the largest wholesale flower market in the United States. In this area, there are two main markets: The Los Angeles Flower Market and the Southern California Flower Market, and both have great prices when buying in bulk or just picking up a few things for the home. For restaurants owners or people who go through lots of produce, there’s the Los Angeles Wholesale Produce Market. Show up extra early in the morning for crates of fresh mangoes, tomatoes, etc. going for bargain prices. Just remember this isn’t Whole Foods, so step lively! The Seafood District includes a few restaurants, most notably Catch 21 and Fisherman’s Outlet Restaurant that also has a seafood market.


Urban Housing

The Warehouse District does not currently have a lot of housing; however developers are proposing a billion-dollar mixed-use complex, City Market, with housing, offices, hotels. If this project gets approved by the City and breaks ground, you can bet developers will be lining up.